steve reich

Final grades posted / Ernie Banks

The semester is over, y’all. It’s in the past. Let us give thanks for what he have learned and how we grown over these past few months, and let us prepare ourselves for much merriment and well-earned festivities.

Your course grades are available on Solar. Take a peek when you feel like it.

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Exam 1 solutions available for your perusal

I know what you’ve been thinking. “Ayo what’s good with those exam 1 solutions? When will they be available for our perusal? I’m mad curious about the solutions and it’s keeping me up at night.” Well, dear students, here they are. Enjoy the bounty, for life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more. It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

And I know I said I’d have the solutions up by Thursday night, and technically it’s Friday right now, but how do you know I’m not in the Central Time Zone? I didn’t say it would be Thursday night everywhere in the world.
Nah, I’m in New York. But I did post the solutions on Thursday night. Check the timestamp yo.

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Steve Reich is one of the great composers of the 20th (and 21st) century; he, along with La Monte Young, Terry Riley, and Philip Glass, developed the style of music that became known as minimalism (though Glass prefers the term “music with repetitive structures”). His most famous piece is Music for 18 Musicians, and it’s crazy good. I was fortunate enough to catch a performance at a chapel at Vassar College about five years ago. That year I also saw a 45th anniversary performance of Riley’s In C at Carnegie Hall in which Philip Glass, the Kronos Quartet, and Riley himself were among the performers. It was tight.